Find your ancestors on free databases on Olive Tree Genealogy
brings you

Past Voices Letters Home. Find your ancestors in letters!

Find your ancestors in old letters

Search free American ancestors' letters!Find ancestors in Civil War letters, War of 1812 letters, Revolutionary War letters. Search your ancestry and find your genealogy. Find your roots and hear your ancestors' words. Discover your origins in old letters as ancestors tell their stories and details of family history. Learn how to preserve old documents, family treasures and heirlooms.
Gender
Home | Share Letters | Ancestor Letters USA | Ancestor Letters Canada | Ancestor Letters UK | Search | Free Newsletter | Genealogy Tips

Your Family Tree


Find Ancestors


Free trials are a great way to find ancestors. Try the Complimentary Trial on Ancestry.com

Have you tried the Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner? Read the reviews, this is perfect for genealogists
Find Your Ancestors


Google Custom Search
Search Olive Tree Genealogy Family of Websites
Spotlight on....
Account Books 1772-1925 Find your ancestors in unique collection of original ledger books from stores, schools and individuals in USA & Canada
Ancestor Photographs
Lost Faces Civil War era ancestor photo albums online
Genealogy & Historical Documents
Paper Trail Assorted Documents: Wills, land records, marriage certs, passports, indentures, slave records, estate inventories...
Family Bibles Births, Marriages & Deaths Family Registers
AncestorsAtRest - Death Records: Wills, obits, funeral cards, memorial cards, death cards...
Paper Trail Genealogy & Historical Documents
Must see!
Coffin Plate Collection Private collection of over 400 coffin plates with names of ancestors plus birth and death dates
Olive Tree Newsletter
FREE subscription Be the first to know about great offers! Weekly updates of new databases. Get tips, research advice and other helpful ideas for finding your elusive brick-wall ancestor
Scrapbooking
Immigrant Collage  Scrapbooking Paper *Immigrant Collage Scrapbooking Paper
*Scrapbooking with Old Cards and Letters
Genealogy Gem
The Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner is great for quick scanning of those precious letters!
Quick Links
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestorsOlive Tree Genealogy - Ships passenger lists and more!
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestors Naturalization Records
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestors AllCensusRecords.com USA & Canada Census Records
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestors AllEnglishRecords.com English Genealogy Records
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestorsThe OTE site Passenger Lists, Orphan Records, Almshouse Records and more!
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestorsShips Lists Online
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestorsCanadian Military Heritage Project
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestorsAncestors At Rest - find death records
Search Ships passenger lists, census, vital stats, church records, military, find your ancestorsOliveTreeBlog - Tips, New Databases...
Brick Wall Help
Your Name in History
Enter your surname for a list of genealogy books with fascinating facts and history about your family name
 

 

Letter to Miss Euphemia Taylor, Norwalk, Connecticut, from Mary Hogg, New York, February 7, 1844

..I had promised one of our acquaintances, Cornelius Delamater, that I would do so; to inform you of his marriage... with a Miss Callers’, a quakeress of Pokeepsie [Poughkeepsie] ...Mary Hogg, New York, February 7, 1844


New York Feby 7th 1844

My Dear Euphemia,

I dare say that you will accuse me of great neglect in not having written to you before now, but I assure you that it was not from want of will but of time, I intended that you should have heard from me the week after I came home, and indeed I had promised one of our acquaintances, (Cornelius Delamater,) that I would do so; to inform you of his marriage, (which took place while I was at your house) with a Miss Callers’, a quakeress of Pokeepsie, and with whom we are now very well acquainted.

I came home just in the very niche of time, to take care of Mother who was seized with a severe attack of Bilious fever, the Doctor attended her twice a day for some time, and it was as much as I could manage to nurse her, and keep house too, for Ellen was out at work just at that time, and as soon as Mother recovered we began to move to Yorkville and a tedious business it was, the weather was so warm, and every thing in the house turned, topsey-turvy, I am glad enough the [that] we are now settled, and although the house is not yet furnished, still it is better than moving.

I was truly sorry to hear of the death of your little Nephew, I think I can imagine your feelings, for indeed I should find it very hard to part with either of my neices, though a child that dies, is far better off than one who lives; Peter’s little girl I had the pleasurable task of weaning for a pleasure it was, she was so very good, and grew quite attached to us, and we to her, she was here the better part of the two weeks, preceding the New Year, and learned to say, Dog, Anty, & how-do, while with us, which was something, (at least we thought so) for a child not then fourteen months old.

The other one has grown very pretty and her ways are so odd, she is the greatest romp I ever saw, for a child of 9 months old, she loves her Aunties so much, that her Mother says that she certainly will be jealous of us, as for Grandmother she dotes on her, Father says that we were never half so lovely when we were little.

If you remember when we were at Ridgefield, Margaret wished me to ask Father, whether the Yew Tree, was not a species of Pine, I have asked him and he says it is not, but it is nearly akin to the Cedar; by the way when you see Mrs Hoyt give my best respects to her, for I shall never forget that delightful ride, and her kindness to us.

I wonder if Sammy Anjovine has done any more worsted work lately; Tell Margaret that I bought that pattern which I spoke of, and have worked about half of it, it is really a very pretty thing, and the admiration of every one who sees it, but she must not raise her hopes too high about it for she might be disappointed, you know that reality seldom comes up to imagination, although I am sure that Margaret is not of that disposition.

I dare say you think that I have acted meanly about that cage I promised you, but when I came to look at them I found that not one of those I had was worth having, they were all broken in o[ne] way or other.

I was glad to hear such good news of John, I wish him together with a happy New Year, as many saucers-full as he can get in your kitchen, tell him that the plant we had a dispute about, is a Ragged Robin for I asked Thomas as spoon as I came home.

You promised us, in your letter, a visit [from] Margaret, this winter I hope you will fulfil it, and come yourself too, if not write soon, either you or Margaret. Aunty desires her love to you all, and wishes me to send your Father this little order, two pair of Prunelle Gaiters, and a pair of buskins, the buskins, and one pair of the boots, to be tipped with Moracca, she says that the last pair of boots fitted her exceedingly well. Remember us all with love to your, Father, Mother, and Margaret

Yours affectionately Mary Hogg

P. S. I had nearly forgot to ask you if you know a Mrs Cholwell formerly Miss Street of Norwalk, Mr Cholwell is from Rhinebeck and Peter’s wife has lately become acquainted with her, and thought she would like to know if you knew her.

Ellen wished me to have left her some room, to, write you a description of her visit to Philadelphia, but she can tell you all about it when you come, I had lift out some things I had to say, but even that did not leave space enough so you must excuse it if you please. Yours – M. H.

Lost Faces Ancestor Photos from the 1800s

Wishing you had an ancestor photograph? Check out the 1800s photographs and antique photo albums on Lost Faces. There are over 3,500 photos in this growing genealogy collection

Notes: Letter to Miss Euphemia Taylor, Norwalk, Connecticut, from Mary Hogg, New York, February 7, 1844; from the Phillip F. Schlee Collection.

Euphemia Taylor (single; aged 60) and Margaret Taylor (single; aged 70) resided in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, in 1880 – occupations: Dress Maker; Cornelius Henry Delamater (b. 1821) married Ruth Oakley Caller on June 14, 1843, in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York. They resided in New York City in 1880 – occupation for Cornelius: Iron Moulder -- George Ring Cholwell (1820-1883) married Mary Eliza Street (1822-1895) in 1843. They resided in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut in 1880.

My Story

   

 

URL is http://www.PastVoices.com/   All rights reserved. Website © Lorine McGinnis Schulze

FAQ - Submit a letter - Search - [Contact Lorine (Change the AT to @ in the email address)] - Copyright - Partner Sites - Site Map