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Cousin Rebecca to to Lucius D. Smith, New London, Oneida co, New York 1825

Hannah thinks of going home with Uncle Joseph Gripp and wife. ..... Cousin Rebecca to to Lucius D. Smith, New London, Oneida co, New York 1825


Old Smith Letters, from RI appprox 1822 to 1836: :

Letter 2: OLD LETTER TO LUCIUS D. SMITH FROM "COUSIN REBECCA", DTD LONG PLEIN, 8TH MONTH 13TH (no year given) (Long Plein is actually Long Plain - Acushnet, Bristol Co. MA) This was mailed to New London, Oneida Co., NY

Dear Cousin, I had just written a letter of congratulations to you on your safe arrival and flattering prospects of health and happiness, when the _reached us concerning the intelligence of Cousin Eunice's sudden indisposition. How often are our anticipations of future enjoyment thus suddenly laid prostrate and we are brought to realize the perishable nature of terrestrial objects.

These things, me thinks, are intended for a salutary lesson and teach us the importance of contracting a friendship with one who will be to us more than all earthly friends, for he will not only comfort and support us while here, but will sustain us in that trying moment to which we are rapidly hastening when all other comforts fail.

We shall cherish the hope that Cousin E - is recovering rather than think she had no symptoms that she is drowsy and says she was subject occasionally to something similar to the erysipelas and was invariably much given to sleep, but should she not recover we shall always be satisfied that her removal to the West was for the best. We are now sure that everything will be done to render the remnant of her life pleasant.

You have doubtless heard by the Fall River people of the death of Job B. Bennett. It gave us a shock from which we have scarcely yet recovered. What a scene of keen affliction is the life of Cousin L_. Her afflictions were no doubt very much centered in J. I suppose he was in all things exactly what she and all his friends deserved. Cousin Edward has been to L - P - once since his death, but he could not speak of him without shedding tears; my very heart ached to see the grief depicted upon his countenance. He said the shock was almost insupportable.

Brig. G- Benjamin expects to leave for Ohio soon. I am not certain whether it is the last of this month, or beginning of next. Cousin Edward seemed to think he would return by New London. He will go on as far as Cincinnati, I believe - then he has been but little down here since you left.

Joseph Allen has concluded not to act in this _some conjecture it is for want_but the pretext is that the house is not good enough for his wife. She you know was Capt. Blackman's daughter, Jane!! They think of purchasing the Aaron Davis farm. Reports say your Uncle J_'s is to be sold at auction. He said purchasers, of course. Neil's will be in lots. I can give you some special information about the Westport proceedings. I inquired of Aunt Hannah what was done. She said the witnesses went and Uncle Neil did not make his appearance, which I suppose meant that the will was proved and no one objected. I began to think it would be so before you left. I very much doubt of it ever being Cousin Edward's intention to do it.

A Mr. Pratt, if he can dispose of his crops, will remove to Michigan -I should have said Illinois - the middle of next month with _all his family and effects with him. His two brothers have arrived there and written glowing descriptions of the country and its produce. This emigrating fever is prevalent to an alarming degree here just now. It has not entirely eased in our family yet.

I do not know whether George will be out to see you or not. He talks some about spending the winter there if he can _I can object to. I do not know what his plans are for he is very still about his matters. Hannah thinks of going home with Uncle Joseph Gripp and wife. If so, she will leave in about seven weeks and will call and pass a night with you on her way up, and afterwards return and make for a visit. I have almost been there in my mind's eye, but that is as far as I expect to.

At present our family are not as fond of removing as I am. I, however, think if George should go we might in time. Aldren Runnesevele??expects to leave for Ithaca the 22nd of next month with his family. He will not purchase at present, but_till he can suit himself. He is anxious to get by a good water privilege. Uncle Abraham's wife is _sick with erysipelas had a physician call this morning, which you know is not common here unless some danger is apprehended. The family was awake to join me in Uncles house.

To you all mother wishes me to enjoin. I inform you to write as soon as possible and let us know how Cousin E - is. We hope to learn that she is much better. It is possible the disorder may be occasioned by the change of climate. We have received three letters from you.

Tell Jacob we want him to write to us. I shall write to him soon. Please write if it is but little and let us know how you are.

From your affectionate, Cousin Rebecca

(I am not sure who the letter is addressed to, it just says: (after reading letter it is obvious it is for Lucius, but the address is: The Postmaster ,New London Oneida County ,New York)

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Name: Barbara Pridgen
E- mail: bgp277@yahoo.com
Notes: Notes: this letter was written about 1825 or after and from towns mentioned, from Bristol Co, MA. It was written to Lucius D. Smith, who lived New London, Oneida co, NY, but he and his wife Betsey B.Kinney were married and had ther first son, Jacob, Fairhaven, MA 1824.

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