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Arthur Stone
34 Massachusetts Infantry

"But, Mother, I want that you should remember that I donít blame you in the least for letting me go..." Arthur Stone, 34th MA Inf, 13 May 1863


Camp Near Fort Ramsey--

Near Uptonís HillóMay 13, 1863

My Dear Mother --

Your most kind and loving letter I received this afternoon, about an hour ago and then the sun was shining and it was very hot here, but now it is raining very hard and the thunder is rolling and the lightening is playing around in the skies and I am here in the tent sitting on my knapsack with my coat off, because it has been so very warm here for the last two or three days that it has been very uncomfortable with hardly anything on.

The men, or a great many of them, have been around barefooted which they were off on duty. It is as warm here as has been for a day or two past as it has been there at home in July. We have got quite a pleasant camp here now. It is near to Fort Ramsey which is occupied by the 11th Mass Battery. They are nine months men and their time is about out a week from today or they have been ordered to report in Washington next week Tuesday. I must say, that I wish that my time was up as soon. Oh and that makes me thing that I believe that you asked me in your letter that you wrote before last, how I feel about your letting me come out here and whether I wished you had kept me at home. I believe that I forgot to answer the question when I wrote before. I will tell you how I feel about it.

Sometimes, or very often, I must say that I thought how easy you might have kept me and how I wished that you had and other times when I sit down and think of it all through calmly, I think that I am glad that I came and I am well satisfied that I never should have been contented if I had not come when I did. I should have come in one of the nine months regiments. I have quite often felt sorry that I was in a rushótoo much of a hurry to come and did not wait until the nine months call was made and come then. But, Mother, I want that you should remember that I donít blame you in the least for letting me go.

There is one thing--I think that we have more things to provoke a fellow in this Regiment then in any other Regiment. I will give you an instance. When we marched the Captain of all our Companies to take as little as we could possibly get along with. So most every man in the Regiment left their poorest pair of pants and their old leather stocks and some of them left their white gloves because the Captain told them to leave their old pants and not take but one pair and all such things. And last Sunday, after we had got up here, when we came out on inspection, the Colonel came around and told the Captains of all the companies to see that every man had a new pair of pants and two pairs of white gloves and a stock and he told the men if they did not have them by next Sunday, he would put every man in the guardhouse and the next day he issued an order so that we have to come out on dress parade with our knapsacks on for two weeks and the Colonel told the Captains the to have the price taken out of the next pay. He says that he will se if the men are going to throw away everything. What do you think of that?

Now, if we should march, I never could carry an extra pair of pants, besides the rest of my things, which is an overcoat, a dress coat, my shirts, towels, stockings, handkerchief, besides my woolen and rubber blankets and other little trinkets and our rations. But enough of that. I wish, Mother, that you would buy one pair or two of woolen stockings and send to me. I had one pair of mine stolen just before we left Fort Lyon. It was not the new pair, but the pair that you sent before that. If you send the box you can send them in that. You asked me if my boots hurt my feet. They do not unless I march off a good ways. About my having anything about my being clerk, I must say that I donít care to do it for Capt. French does the writing and has to do duty in the Company besides doing the writing.

I have heard that Allie (?) was spreading him self around since he has been going to school as large as life. I had heard that Mary Hunter was going to be married soon, some time ago. I donít think that Mr. Corliss waited hardly long enough to show proper respect to his wife. But I do not think of anything more to write. Your loving and true SonÖArthur B. StoneÖ

P.S. I heard last evening after I had written the letter by one of the Sergeantís in our Regiment that went down to see his brother that was wounded from the 10th, he saw a fellow that enlisted from Spencer that I know by the name of John Beaumont and that Beaumont was wounded in the head. And he said that Henry Jones was killed. Have you heard so yet? Henry Jones came there at Fort Lyon to see us the day before we went down to the Regiment. Arthur

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Submitter: Sherri Cawley Notes:

Written by Arthur M. Stone to his Mother from Camp Near Fort Ramsey, Washington, D. C. on May 13, 1863. Arthur Stone mustered into Company E, Massachusetts 34th Infantry on July 31, 1862. Shortly after this letter was written, on July 9, 1863, Stone and his Regiment were ordered away from the defenses of Washington. On July 9, 1863, the 34th Mass. were off to Harper's Ferry, where it occupied a position near Fort Duncan as a part of Gen. Negley's Brigade. On July 15 it crossed the Potomac, and took possession of Harper's Ferry, establishing itself on Camp Hill.

Brian Brown, author of In the Footsteps of the Blue and Gray: A Civil War Research Handbook which can be purchased from ABE Books kindly sends the following information: Arthur M. Stone was an 18 year old bootmaker from Spencer, Mass. when he enliste d in Company E, 34 th Mass. Infantry. He served July 19, 1862 to June 16, 1865. He later lived in Worcester, Mass. and died June 14, 1912.

My Story

Stone Collection

30 Dec. 1862 | 20 Feb. 1863 | 13 May 1863

   

 

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